The Global Islamic Economy Summit announces title sponsors

Thomson Reuters and the Dubai Chamber of Commerce & Industry, the organisers of the upcoming ‘Global Islamic Economy Summit’ (GIES), announced their partnership with ADIB and Dubai Islamic Bank, who are taking on the role of Title Sponsors of the event.

The Global Islamic Economy Summit announces title sponsors

The Global Islamic Economy Summit announces title sponsors

In addition, the leading Nutrition, Health and Wellness company, Nestlé Middle East, signs up as Diamond Sponsor, while Emirates NBD, Qatar First Bank and the Global University of Islamic Finance (INCEIF) have also signed on as Gold Sponsors, while the Dubai Multi Commodities Centre (DMCC), Afridi & Angell Legal Consultants, Société Générale and MasterCard have signed on as Silver Sponsors.
GIES is held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai. While in line with Dubai’s Islamic Economy Strategy announced by His Highness on October 5, the conference also seeks to addresses the challenges and opportunities the industry faces and its contribution to the global economy.
Russell Haworth, Managing Director – Middle East & North Africa, Thomson Reuters, said, “The calibre of sponsors supporting GIES is testament to the local and international interest in the opportunities that the Islamic Economy presents. From leading local, regional and Islamic banks that aspire to become international players, to a European bank that sees a huge opportunity in this sector, to a global food producer, education, consumer credit and legal services providers and the largest free zone in the UAE, our sponsors will be invaluable to the success of GIES.”
Tirad Al Mahmoud, CEO at A DIB said, “At A DIB, we hold an unwavering commitment to playing a role in the development of the Islamic finance industry. We are very excited to be lead supporters for The Global Islamic Economy Summit – an ideal platform to share our core values as an expanding Islamic financial services institution with the wider community in the UAE, region and beyond.”
GIES, Dr Adnan Chilwan, Chief Executive Officer of DIB said. “Being the first Islamic bank in the world, Dubai Islamic Bank is proud to play its role in the Global Islamic Economy Summit. As pioneers of Islamic banking, DIB has been at the forefront of developments in the Islamic financial sector over the past four decades. We have consistently added value to the franchise and contributed to the growth and development of all sectors of the UAE economy. Our vision of becoming the most progressive financial institution in the world is fully in line with the vision of the leadership of this great country. Today, with our rich heritage, unrivalled expertise and tradition of innovation, we are perfectly positioned to play a key role in Dubai becoming the global capital of Islamic economy.”
GIES aims to initiate critical dialogue on the development of the integrated sectors of the Islamic Economy, covering Islamic financial services, Halal food, Halal Lifestyle, Halal Travel, SME Development and Islamic Economy Infrastructure such as standardization and research.
Yves Manghardt, Chairman and CEO Nestle Middle East FZE, commented on the company’s role as a sponsor: “As the leading Nutrition Health and Wellness company, Nestlé is proud to be a partner of the Global Islamic Economy Summit. We have been pioneers in providing a wide range of Halal food options for Muslim consumers around the world, and we are delighted to be part of Dubai’s initiatives to highlight the importance of the Halal sector as a key component of the Islamic economy and culture.”
The Summit will also feature ground-breaking market studies and other announcements such as the winners of the ‘Islamic Economy Award’ which recognises a mix of regional and global leaders from 14 Islamic economy sectors.
GIES will take place on 25th – 26th November, 2013 at Madinat Jumeirah in Dubai. GIES will gather leading thinkers, policy makers and stakeholders from around the world to lead a discussion on the future of the Islamic economy.

Path Solutions implements iMAL Islamic banking solution at Cihan Bank

Path Solutions announced the successful go live of iMAL at Cihan Bank, Erbil. Cihan, the first privately owned bank in Kurdistan first partnered with Path Solutions in October 2009 on this multi-lingual, multi-currency and multi-channel implementation.

Specifically in this deployment, Path Solutions implemented the following scope in line with the bank’s expectations: Retail Financing, Treasury, Investment, Branch Automation, Trade Finance Operations, Islamic Profit Calculation and Central Bank Reporting.

Cihan is a running Retail Bank with a paid up capital of 150 Billion IQD i.e. 127 million USD. It has been operating since April 2009, providing its services through 7 branches all over the country. The bank is a member of Cihan Group which is one of the biggest groups in Iraq, with business lines spread in many fields such as cars trading, construction, education, media, insurance and general trading.

“The implementation at Cihan Bank encountered major challenges mainly due to the Iraqi banking environment in general and specifically in Erbil. The bank was operating without the existence of a banking system and therefore most of the operations were executed and maintained manually. The challenges were of a different kind, where lots of efforts and time were spent on convincing the end users to rely on a banking system prior to convincing them to go with iMAL “, explained Alain Abou Khalil, SVP Professional Services, Path Solutions.

Abou Khalil continued: “We are excited to see the successful go live of iMAL – our first live user in Erbil out of 4 customers we have in Iraq. We pride ourselves on being able to support the specific needs of Cihan Bank, and ensuring we can serve their local requirements. iMAL will allow Cihan Bank to quickly deploy innovative Islamic banking products to an expanding customer base”.

Path Solutions’ iMAL provides a 360-degree view of customer relationships and transactional information across channels, allowing Cihan Bank to understand customers’ needs and rapidly identify cross-selling and up-selling opportunities.

The highly scalable infrastructure of iMAL Islamic banking solution will enable Cihan Bank to meet its projected expansion plans, whilst contributing to the economic growth of the country.

Naz Bajger, Director – Head of IT, Cihan Bank said: “We needed a very reliable banking solution that could provide us with the means for next generation growth. With the successful implementation of the best-of-breed iMAL Islamic banking solution, we now have a robust platform that will grow and evolve with us and will help us manage efficiently our network operations. I would like to thank the teams for their professionalism and constructive efforts in the implementation and support of this project particularly the Project Managers Abbas Aljawahiry and Dina Moh’d who were dedicated on a full time basis to deliver quality output. I am very glad to see that the joint efforts led to the success of this project”.

At a time of greater market regulation and increasing customer demands, Islamic banks need to reposition themselves. The seamless rollout of the iMAL Islamic banking solution at Cihan Bank illustrates nicely the performance of iMAL in boosting the bank’s competitiveness as well as the broadest experience of Path Solutions’ PS team in managing such challenging implementations.

Path Solutions announced the successful go live of iMAL at Cihan Bank, Erbil. Cihan, the first privately owned bank in Kurdistan first partnered with Path Solutions in October 2009 on this multi-lingual, multi-currency and multi-channel implementation.

 

http://www.ameinfo.com/292755.html

Emirates NBD 'names banks to plan Swiss franc bond issue'

Emirates NBD is planning to issue a Swiss franc-denominated bond, four sources said yesterday.

The lender has appointed banks for the issue, one banking source familiar with the matter told Reuters.

“The bank is looking at it [and] has appointed banks,” source said, declining to name the mandated banks.

Emirates NBD has just over Dh8 billion in debt maturing this year, including a $1.5-billion (Dh5.50 billion) loan due in October.

The bank reported a sharp fall in quarterly profit on Wednesday for a second consecutive quarter on provisioning for bad loans. Its Islamic subsidiary, Emirates Islamic Bank, reopened Gulf bond markets this year with a $500 million Islamic bond, or sukuk, in January, which carried a profit rate of 4.72 per cent.

In 2007, Emirates NBD completed a 100-million Swiss franc (Dh399.20 million) three-year guaranteed floating rate bond which paid 7 basis points over three-month Swiss Libor, according to Thomson Reuters data. Under the terms of a guaranteed bond, the principal and interest is paid by someone other than the issuer.

In the last two years, other Gulf banks have sought to take advantage of a favourable swap rate between the Swiss franc and US dollar, the currency most Gulf currencies are pegged to. Commercial Bank of Qatar, Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank and First Gulf Bank have all tapped Swiss liquidity since 2010.

http://gulfnews.com/business/banking/emirates-nbd-names-banks-to-plan-swiss-franc-bond-issue-1.982120

Islamic banking draft moots five-member Sharia board

MUSCAT: A five-member Sharia board, exclusive branches for window operation, clear cut segregation of conventional and Islamic banking with separate teams of people and accounts and a 12 per cent capital adequacy ratio are the main highlights of the Islamic Banking Draft Framework (IBRF) presented by the Central Bank of Oman before chief executives of banks in Oman.

CBO has organised a consultative meeting for top officials of banks on January 25 for presenting the draft Islamic banking rules, which the apex bank’s consultants Ernst & Young termed as a ‘unique model.’ The banking regulator is still working on the regulation, and may incorporate changes on the basis of feedbacks from banks, before announcing it. Ernst & Young has advised the CBO on fixing of lending limits, single borrower limit, writing of rule books, procedures for reporting structure for Islamic banks and formation of Sharia board.

Of the five-member Sharia board, three should be experienced Islamic scholars and two should be from relevant field, either a professional in Islamic law or Islamic accounting, chief executive officers of two leading banks, who attended the consultative meeting, told Times of Oman. CBO’s draft regulation also stipulates on separate branches for Islamic banking window operation of conventional banks.

“There needs to be a separate team of people for accounts, information technology, marketing and compliance for Islamic banking line of business. There is also a separate head for Islamic banking. However, the back office support can be common for conventional and Islamic banking.

The whole idea is to create a perception among general public that these are two distinctly different lines of business,” said a chief executive of a bank, who does not want to be named. The draft regulation also insists on a 12 per cent capital adequacy, with a minimum paid up capital of RO10 million for starting window operation.

Another major suggestion for window operation is that funds can be pumped into Islamic line of business by a conventional parent bank, but Islamic banking operation can not transfer money for using it in conventional banking. “This could create problems at the macro-level, at least initially.

For instance, if all banks put together transfer RO1 billion into Islamic banking initially and in case half of the total funds can not be deployed due to lack of demand for credit, then the money can not be transferred back to conventional line of business for effectively deploying in the financial system,” noted another CEO of a bank, who viewed it on a macro economic level.

Another major concern expressed by bankers is the lack of availability of Sharia scholars to become board members of Islamic banking. “Everybody is getting into Islamic banking now. We are talking about 30 Sharia scholars. It is difficult to get people with relevant experience and it is going to be a challenge.

Even the region does not have that many people. This is what we are discussing with the Central Bank of Oman,” noted the official. It is also not clear whether a Sharia scholar can be a member of two boards.

Bankers also expressed their concerns on segregating risk management for Islamic banking line of business from conventional banking. “At the end of the day, risk is the same whether it is Islamic banking line of business or conventional line of business. And therefore, it should be on the parent bank and not separate it for Islamic banking,” noted the banker.

Sources also noted that there will be severe competition, with the imminent entry of two Islamic banks.

http://www.timesofoman.com/innercat.asp?cat=&detail=54388&sec=news

Sukuk issuance surpasses pre-crisis levels

Islamic bond issuance last year surpassed pre-crisis levels for the first time – after more than doubling in volume – while one bookrunner predicted momentum will continue with a further 50% rise in 2012.

The volume of sukuks, or bonds that are Shariah-compliant, issued during the year rose to $32.6bn, from $14.9bn in 2010, with roughly half the volume of deals occurring in the fourth quarter, according to data from Dealogic. It was the first time volume surpassed pre-crisis levels.

The bonds benefitted from uncertainty in the global market, which drove investors to more stable issuances, according to HSBC Amanah, which was the fourth largest bookrunner last year. The firm said it expected the momentum to continue into 2012, anticipating a total of $44bn in deals this year.

Despite a rise in the number and volume of deals in the Middle East last year, Malaysia remained the dominant nationality of deals, with the year’s five largest sukuks issued by the country’s government or corporates.

There were $25.4bn of Malaysian sukuks issued during the year, while Malaysian financial services firm CIMB Group was the top bookrunner with $7.9bn in proceeds.The largest deal last year was a $6.1bn sukuk issued by an investment holding company owned by the Malaysian government treasury, Khazanah Nasional.

The United Arab Emirates represented the second most popular country for bond issuance with $2.6bn in deals during 2011, according to Dealogic.

Government-related sukuks will continue to dominate the market in 2012, according to a year-end HSBC Amanah forecast, with Asian and Middle Eastern infrastructure projects acting as major drivers. Malaysian toll and highway firm Projek Lebuhraya Usahasama Berhad kicked off the year by announcing that it would issue a massive $9.7bn sukuk.

Middle East banking group Emirates NBD and First Gulf Bank both had $500m issuances in the first two weeks of January. Dubai Islamic Bank had a $300m issuance.

Mohammed Dawood, managing director of Islamic global markets for Emea at HSBC Amanah said demand has continued outstrip supply in January, which has been the busiest start to the year he’s seen.

“Sukuk is favoured by investors because it has been less volatile than conventional issuances, especially in the last four months of 2011. Issuers on the other hand, like sukuk because it gives them access to a new investor base,” Dawood said in HSBC’s projections for the new year.

http://www.efinancialnews.com/story/2012-01-31/islamic-bond-issuance-reaches-pre-crisis-levels-in-2011

NBAD participates in Tawdeef Career Fair

WAM Abu Dhabi, Jan 30th, 2012 (WAM) — The National Bank of Abu Dhabi (NBAD) is platinum sponsor of Tawdeef Career Fair staring from tomorrow at Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre (ADNEC).

NBAD’s sponsorship and participation in Tawdeef is part of the Bank’s Emiratisation drive to attract, retain, and continuously develop the skills of UAE nationals.

During the career fair, NBAD will offer onsite interviews with the candidates. It will also bring representatives from Abu Dhabi National Islamic Finance (ADNIF), the Islamic finance and banking arm of NBAD, to give insight into ADNIF and career opportunities available.

“Participating in career fairs gives us a great opportunity to meet job seekers and identify and recruit promising candidates,” said Ehab Anis Hassan, the Group Chief Human Resources Officer at NBAD. “NBAD’s Emiratisation strategy goes beyond hiring UAE’s nationals; developing skills and education is at the heart of this strategy which made the Bank an employer of choice for UAE nationals.

” NBAD has launched several Emiratisation programme which aim to develop and maximise the potentials of Emiratis in different stages. For instance, under the AFAQ Management trainee Programme, NBAD sponsors a Master of Science in Finance by recruiting recent university graduates who exhibited great motivation and the potential to grow into future leaders.

The recruits complete post graduate certificate which is equivalent to half of the Master’s requirement in the first year by studying fulltime at the academy. During this period, they receive full employment salary. After the first year, AFAQ recruits are assigned to their permanent position. While they work fulltime, they continue studying part-time toward the completion of the Master’s Degree.

“NBAD is committed to Abu Dhabi 2030 Vision and plays a vital role in diversifying the economy. This is why we design sustainable Emiratisation programmes to empower UAE nationals to contribute effectively in the development of the economy and the Bank,” explained Suaad Al Shammari, the Emiratisation Manager at NBAD.

“The Bank has successfully increased Emiratisation from 30% in 2008 to 39% by end of 2011 and this year we aim to recruit over 100 UAE nationals to meet the Government’s mandate of 40% Emiratisation,” she added.

http://www.wam.org.ae/servlet/Satellite?c=WamLocEnews&cid=1289997219441&p=1135099400124&pagename=WAM%2FWamLocEnews%2FW-T-LEN-FullNews

Dubai's Majid al Futtaim announces sukuk roadshow

Dubai’s Majid al Futtaim will begin meeting investors on Sunday ahead of a potential Islamic bond, or sukuk issue, a statement from the lead managers said on Tuesday.

The mall developer, which is the sole franchise for Carrefour in the Gulf, will meet investors in Abu Dhabi and Dubai on January 29, before a second day of roadshows in London and Kuala Lumpur on January 30, it said.

Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank, Dubai Islamic Bank , HSBC and Standard Chartered are the lead managers for the potential transaction, which would be the company’s first debt capital markets issue.

The company has been eyeing global debt markets for several months, completing a series of roadshows for a conventional bond in June but not going ahead with a print because of the impact of market volatility on pricing.

It then set up a sukuk programme to have the option to tap Islamic liquidity and take advantage of healthy demand for sharia-compliant assets amid ongoing global risk aversion.

A senior executive told Reuters in November the company hoped to raise between $350 million and $500 million from its debut sukuk offering.

This would be the first issuance by a private corporate firm in the Gulf and is regarded as a vanguard for other private sector companies in the region who, hit by limited liquidity in the loan market, are searching for new finance streams.

The unlisted firm raised $1 billion loan from a group of banks in July which was used for refinancing of a $1 billion loan maturing later this year.

MAF’s revenues grew by 10 percent year over year to 18.7 billion dirhams ($5.09 billion) last year and its net debt was around 7.5 billion dirhams.The developer expects to open around 15 new Carrefour hypermarkets and about 25 to 30 new supermarkets in 2012.

http://www.emirates247.com/business/corporate/dubai-s-majid-al-futtaim-announces-sukuk-roadshow-2012-01-25-1.439425

Islamic finance industry set for ‘a big leap’ in Oman

MUSCAT: Oman’s First Islamic Finance and Banking Conference opened yesterday with a call to stake holders to take effective steps in promoting Islamic finance in their countries.

Speaking as the chief guest, Darwish bin Ismail bin Ali Al Balushi, minister responsible for financial affairs, said, “with an annual growth of 20 per cent and total assets worth a trillion US dollars the Islamic finance industry is poised for a leap in the coming years and time is opportune to lend it a push.

He said that a study conducted in Oman revealed that 85 per cent of people favoured buying Islamic products and 70 per cent would opt for deposits in Islamic savings account whenever they are made available. This suggests the volume of interest shown by people in Oman in pursuing Islamic finance.”

The conference is organised by Al Iktissad Wal Amal Group (Lebanon) in association with the Central Bank of Oman.Delivering a key-note address, Dr Ahmed Mohamed Ali, president of the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), said that the conference provides a good opportunity for business leaders and decision-makers from different countries to interact and offer effective solutions to some challenges facing the Islamic finance industry.

He pointed out that major international agencies — Standard & Poor’s, Fitch Ratings and Moody’s — have given IDB the highest ‘AAA’ credit rating. He said that the IDB had provided total finances of more than $800 billion towards short-term and long-term projects in member countries since its establishment in 1975.

Dr Ahmed said, “The Islamic Corporation for Insurance of Investments and Export Credits (ICIEC) was formed with the objective to enlarge the scope of trade transactions and investment flows among the member countries of the Organisation of Islamic Conference (OIC);

Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) was established to complement IDB through the development and promotion of the private sector, as a vehicle for economic growth and development in member countries while the Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI).

IRTI was established to help the Bank in discharging its functions in the fields of research and training assigned to it by its Articles of Agreement.” Mohammed Jamil Berro, chief executive officer, Al Hilal Bank, focused on Islamic banking growth by international expansion.

He said, “Al Hilal Bank has 28 branches in the UAE and its revenue crossed Dh1.73 million.” The bank has around 50,000 customers. With 10 per cent Muslim GDP and only one per cent global Islamic assets penetration, the global Islamic finance presents significant growth opportunities.”

Abdel Kader Askalan, CEO, Oman Arab Bank, said, “A central authority on Islamic Finance has to be established under OIC (Organisation of Islamic Countries) to develop regulatory legislation. Islamic finance has achieved remarkable growth in the past few years in the GCC region with 450 institutions worldwide of which 40 per cent are based in the Arab region.”

“GCC alone takes two-third of the world assets worth $ 700 billion. Islamic finace should be ready to face requirements of globalisations.”

http://www.timesofoman.com/innercat.asp?cat=&detail=53940&sec=news

Qatar Islamic banking directive to set example for other markets

The deadline of Dec. 31, 2011, as per the directive issued by the Central Bank of Qatar (CBQ) in January 2011 requiring the country’s conventional banks which have opened Islamic banking windows to close them down, has passed almost unnoticed.

Despite the initial outcry at the time of the announcement of the directive stressing that it was too arbitrary and the grace period was too tight, there has been no upheaval of the Islamic finance industry in the emirate. Some Islamic bankers are now arguing that the move was required to stem the alleged rampant co-mingling of conventional and Islamic funds at some of the Islamic banking windows, and that the Qatari Islamic banking sector has been successfully re-aligned and consolidated.

The successful implementation of the directive in Qatar could well have implications for other markets in the region and beyond where Islamic banking windows are prevalent. The clear message of the directive is that dedicated standalone Islamic banks are preferable to half-way houses where co-mingling and all sorts of compromises are possible if not the norm. They also give greater legal, regulatory and Shariah compliance clarity and comfort to those depositors and investors interested in Islamic finance.

The affected banks included the Al-Islami window of Qatar National Bank (QNB), the largest bank in the emirate; Commercial Bank of Qatar; Doha Bank; HSBC Amanah; Ahli Bank; Al-Khaliji Bank and International Bank of Qatar (IBQ), which between them had 16 Islamic banking branches in Qatar.

On Jan. 1, 2012 it became clear that only one such window, Al-Yusr of International Bank of Qatar, was acquired by two local Islamic banks — the retail banking assets and business was acquired by Barwa Bank, the newest of the Qatari Islamic banks, while the corporate banking assets and portfolio was acquired by Qatar Islamic Bank (QIB), the largest Islamic bank in the emirate.

The other banks had wound down their Islamic banking window operations complete with removing all signage and of course not opening any new accounts or businesses. Existing Islamic banking customers were in some cases given the option of switching to the banks’ conventional banking business or in other cases to continue payments until affected Islamic financing facilities matured.

An unrepentant CBQ Gov. Sheikh Abdullah bin Saud Al-Thani as late as mid December 2011 warned the affected banks that the directive was “irreversible” and that they must comply with its provisions. In his keynote speech to the 8th International Conference on Islamic Economics and Finance (ICIEF) which was held in Doha in December 2011, Al-Thani articulated the reasons behind the central bank’s directive, which he confirmed is irreversible.

The Islamic Banking Windows, according to Gov. Al-Thani, made it difficult for the banking regulator to effectively implement its monitoring and supervision of these windows.

This issue could not have been highlighted more aptly during the acquisition of Al-Yusr’s Islamic Retail Banking business. As the first such transaction to be closed in the region, albeit under Qatari law, there were some legal and other regulatory challenges which UK law firm, Eversheds, which acted for Barwa Bank, successfully navigated through within the provisions of existing Qatari legislation.

“The IBQ window was not a separate legal entity. As such, its assets and liabilities were a part of the conventional bank. We therefore had to consider how best to separate and then package and transfer these assets and liabilities. There were also challenges concerning transition services that were required post completion to serve the transferring customers,” explained Amjad Hussain, partner and head of Islamic Finance at Eversheds, in a recent interview.

The central bank also found that the coupling of conventional and Islamic banking activities at the same institution, undermined competition and transparency in the affected banks. At the same time, there is much confusion over the balance sheet treatment of the assets and liabilities of the Islamic banking windows in the financial reports of the conventional banks, which are not separated. As such this has implications for the risk management process of the institution.

Al-Thani gave the thumbs up to the Qatari Islamic banking industry which boasts four Islamic banks — Qatar Islamic Bank, Qatar International Islamic Bank, Masraf Al-Rayan and Barwa Bank. These banks, he added, have a crucial role in the country’s banking sector and economy, in compliance with the objectives of the Qatar Vision 2030 and its first application through the First Strategic National Development Project 2011-2016.

He reminded Qatari Islamic banks of their partnership role in financing economic development and projects in the country, and stressed that he was confident that the Qatari Islamic banks will rise to and are capable of taking up this challenge together with their conventional counterparts. The Islamic banking sector has a 20 percent market share of the total banking industry in Qatar, which has four dedicated standalone Islamic banks.

It was way back in 2005 that the CBQ allowed conventional banks to launch Islamic Banking Units (IBUs), which have contributed to the growth of the sector and to the profitability of the banks, and which have attracted an estimated customer base of just under 100,000.

Eversheds’ Hussain rejects any notion of arbitrariness in the action of the CBQ in issuing the directive. The action, he contended, is “part of a wider process of supporting and shoring up the banking industry in Qatar. You have to look at it in the context of the proactive approach of the central bank during the recession when it helped a number of local banks to remove some of the toxic debts that they had exposure to. The CBQ is also making sure that there are enough opportunities for all the market players.”

Previously, the Islamic banking windows were barely competing because of co-mingling issues and because they were able to offset overheads through the conventional banks. There was a feeling that the market was not as transparent as it could be. In addition to regulatory issues, the central bank had to deal with two separate businesses dealing with different banking activities – Islamic and conventional.

“I believe competition was an issue, because the pure Islamic banks were seen to be at a disadvantage. The Islamic banking windows at the conventional banks were able to use backroom services in their banks. There were also regulatory and corporate governance concerning how manage different banking platforms under one roof which is what the conventional banks were trying to do. This resulted in a culmination of issues which the CBQ is trying to address in its efforts to improve out the banking sector,” explained Hussain.

http://arabnews.com/economy/islamicfinance/article566853.ece

Qatar Islamic Drops as Earnings Miss Estimates, Dividend Cut: Doha Mover

Qatar Islamic Bank (QIBK) led declines in the nation’s banking stocks after profit missed analysts’ estimates and the Shariah-compliant lender reduced its dividend.

The shares of the Persian Gulf country’s biggest Islamic bank dropped 3.1 percent, the most since March 14, to 80.3 riyals, at the 1 p.m. close in Doha. Doha Bank QSC (DHBK) lost 2.9 percent after reporting earnings that matched estimates.

Qatar National Bank SAQ (QNBK), the country’s biggest lender, retreated as much as 0.5 percent. QIB and Doha Bank had the biggest percentage declines on the country’s benchmark stock measure, the QE Index, (DSM) which fell 1.1 percent.

QIB’s “net income missed consensus by a significant amount which is now being priced in,” said Ali Khan, London-based head of Middle East and North Africa equities sales at Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc. “The dividend has been reduced as well, which usually creates negative price action.”

The bank’s full-year net income was 1.37 billion riyals ($376 million) after 1.26 billion riyals a year earlier.

The mean estimate of eight analysts was for a profit of 1.46 billion riyals, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The lender plans to pay a 4.5 riyal-cash dividend compared with 5 riyals a year earlier.Qatar’s QE Banking Index dropped 1.5 percent, bringing its drop for the year to 4.4 percent.

Doha Bank, the emirate’s third-largest bank by total loans, posted an 18 percent increase in 2011 profit to 1.24 billion riyals. The company may increase the size of a $500 million bond it plans to sell this quarter, said Chief Executive Officer Raghavan Seetharaman.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-01-19/qatar-islamic-bank-drops-as-earnings-miss-estimates-doha-mover.html